C For Men

PREPPING THE NEW STORE BEFORE OPENING. PHOTO: Courtesy of Industry of All Nations.
MR. MUTHU OF TAMIL NADU, INDIA, HAND-STAMPING BATIK GARMENTS. PHOTO: Courtesy of Industry of All Nations.
BROTHERS FERNANDO AND JUAN DIEGO GERSCOVICH. PHOTO: Sera Lindsey.
NATURAL PLANT AND MINERAL BASED DYES FOR TEXTILES. PHOTO: Courtesy of Industry of All Nations.
DEBUT STOREFRONT ON ABBOT KINNEY. PHOTO: Courtesy of Industry of All Nations.
ANCIENT PROCESS OF EXTRACTING INDIGO DYE. PHOTO: Courtesy of Industry of All Nations.

Good Stock

by slh

Juan Diego Gerscovich and his two brothers, Fernando and Patricio, were raised at the beach.

Juan Diego Gerscovich and his two brothers, Fernando and Patricio, were raised at the beach. But rather than cavort in the surf or bury each other in the sand, they opted for a less typical hobby: a game of logos, in which they’d trace and challenge each other to recognize brand identities in the wet pack—be it Nike’s swoosh or Benetton’s stylized knitting stitch. It was a sign of things to come: The Argentinian trio, whose parents owned a pret-a-porter brand, Arianna, in the ’60s, would go on to found Industry of all Nations, a socially minded home goods and apparel company headquartered in Culver City that show­cases sustainably crafted and authentically constructed pieces from all over the world.

Blending Juan and Fernando’s design backgrounds (both are trained architects) with Patricio’s business savvy (he also works in finance at a major bank in Miami), the label marks an evolution from Juan and Fernando’s prior endeavor, Sundayland, a design practice focused on high-end decorative items. “It was very expensive and only for certain types of people,” says Juan. “Fashion lets us express ourselves in a more dynamic way.” Launched in 2010 with alpargatas, a biodegradable Argentinian espadrille manufactured by a factory that has been in operation since 1895, the company has since expanded to stock everything from alpaca sweaters hand-knit in Bolivia to the folding Panamericana chair, crafted in Indonesia exclusively from plantation teak, as well as joined forces for collaborations with the likes of J.Crew. In September they opened their first boutique on Abbot Kinney, a modern, 680-square-foot L-shaped space where “basic to the extreme” (in Juan’s words) interiors are composed of powder-coated white metal, white pine and recycled cardboard.

Next up: a range of batik-dyed organic beach towels, women’s apparel, a high-end denim line and an exclusive sneaker with French brand Veja. The common thread? The lofty aspiration to change commerce, and the world, for the better, through each and every conscientiously produced product: “When people shop they are telling companies and societies what’s good and what’s not good,” says Juan. “It’s powerful to the extreme—even more than voting: We vote once every four years, but we shop every day.” 1121 Abbot Kinney Blvd., Venice, 310-392-6000; industryofallnations.com. •  MELISSA GOLDSTEIN.

Edited by KELSEY McKINNON.